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Jan032011

Kaixin OpEd - January 2011

 

 

 

 

Kaixin's Daily OpEd

 

 

CCTV9 Dialouge 4/2/2011

Filial piety as law

See Kaixin's - Tiger Mum - Amy Chua 'Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother'

 

The New York Times   31/1/2011

China Might Force Visits to Mom and Dad

Under a proposal from the Civil Affairs Ministry, adult children would be required by law to regularly visit their elderly parents. If they do not, parents can sue them.

Kaixin OpEd – ‘Once ensconced in intimate neighborhoods of courtyard houses and small lanes and surrounded by relatives and acquaintances, older people in China are increasingly moving into lonely high-rises and feeling forgotten, he said.

Welcome to the west!

This proposed law is founded in compassion but will be dashed on the rocks of reality.

Xiaosui and our friends in China agree that the elderly are being forgotten, however a law will not address the issue. It will take either a change of attitude or the revival of the old ways where the elderly were treated as respected members of the family, not burdens.

How do you ‘prove’ in a court of law such a proposition? What defences will be allowed?

The first generation of only children are far more mobile, often live in different cities and are facing increasing costs of living. Many have neither the time nor means to visit their parent, even if they wanted to.

Will lack of money be a defence?

The elderly in China, and Asian societies in general, feel an obligation to their children. It is why the suicide rate is climbing. They are lonely and isolated, but do not want to be a burden on their children.

High quality aged care is probably the answer. The west has some good models to work from.

It is not ideal, but perhaps it is better than being alone and isolated in a high rise apartment.

 

The Wall Street Journal   31/1/2011

Turkish Minister Says China Gaining Unfair Advantage

It doesn’t matter whether or not China and the U.S. are actively trying to keep their currencies low, the end result is pain for emerging markets, Turkish Finance Minister Mehmet Simsek said Saturday.

Kaixin OpEd – China accumulates 3 trillion in reserves because, the west argues, it has held its currency down artificially. No mention of hard work and thrift.

In terms of purchasing distressed ‘western’ assets as the GFC aftermath continues, then it would be in China’s interests to increase the value of the Yuan.

Actually, China wins either way.

Why?

Because of the hard work and thrift that accumulated such vast wealth.

Perhaps the ‘west’ should ponder on this rather than just complain.

As Kaixin is now saying rather repetitively, China is an opportunity, not a threat.

However, ‘western’ companies have to get off their butts to take advantage of that opportunity. 

 

WSJ MarketWatch 30/1/2011

How to profit from consumers in emerging markets

Middle class gains strength, but inflation challenges stock investors

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) — The rise of emerging market consumers, with their young populations and higher disposable incomes and spending, has contributed mightily to the growth of China, India, Brazil and other developing nations.

Now the consumer in these fast-track economies has been knocked off the shelf, along with investors who have banked on the growing middle class.

Kaixin OpEd – Kaixin has been saying this for some time. China (and the other BRICS in the wall) are an opportunity to be seized, not a threat.

Leading businesses have already moved in that direct, others are now starting to realise the potential and are looking in the right direction at last.

See Kaixin's - ECONOMIC CHINA

 

 

The Age   29/1/2011

Well-versed economy watchers should turn their minds to Chinese steel

Think of China, think of Australia making big bucks.

YOU want to make guesses about what will happen to the economy this year? Here's a tip: forget the floods and take more notice of China.

Australia's business economists have already got the message that China dominates the rest of the world's effects on us, whereas their mates in the money markets are slower on the uptake, retaining their obsession with all things American.

China matters, first, because, with a population of 1.35 billion, it's the most populous country in the world. That gives it 20 per cent of the world's population, making it 11 times larger than Japan.

Kaixin Oped – Kaixin has noted before that with around 1.4 Bill people beavering away there is a lot of economic activity going on.

They have been beavering for the last 30 years, since Deng Xiaoping removed the shackles.

The are beavering now and they will continue to beaver.

In this respect, size does matter …

See Kaixin's - China & US Relations 'The fundamental source of power for a nation, or empire, is its people.'

 

The Age   29/1/2011

A leap too far leaves China at risk
John Garnaut

After three decades of phenomenal growth, the risks to China's economy are mounting. Australia needs to take note.

Kaixin OpEd - Young John is such a media tart. He loves a good scary news story and loves to huddle in corners with earnest Chinese dissidents.

Still, I suppose it’s by nature of the professions he’s in.

Xiaosui and I were watching a show on China’s CCTV1 (yes we have satellite TV) in which a senior journalist from Germany was being interviewed. She spoke very good Chinese and had over thirty years experience reporting on all things Chinese. She had lived in Beijing all that time.

She said that she was always being approached by people with stories of doom and gloom about China. She was always being approached with people who had a gripe and people who desperately wanted to become world famous dissidents. She soon learned that there was much more the China than that. She left that side to the in-experienced and shallow. She concentrated on substantial news stories and where possible positive ones. She did not take a step back if she thought that criticism was necessary, but did not make that the theme of her reporting, as young John is hell bent on doing.

I could paint different pictures of every country depending on who I spoke to and what events I covered.

Of course it’s going to rain sometime, of course there will be a correction if the trajectory of economic growth is too high.

However you cannot write off over a billion people beavering away to make their life better.

The same goes for America where the doomsayers are circling. There are a hell of a lot of Americans working to make America a better place.

In both countries the governments are trying to manage the situation.

Kaixin has often opined that Washington and the Fed are responsible for the economic mess America is in by letting the dogs of greed off the leash. They are trying to put them back in the kennel again and getting a few bites along the way.

China is not letting them off the leash. Beijing is having a hard time stopping them barking and waking the neighbours, but they are still in their kennel.

It will be interesting the see the outcome.

Kaixin predicts that America will find a way to heal its economic wounds and China will find a way out of the problems being caused by its stellar growth.

There will be some bumps and bites along the way, but not mortal.

Kaixin does agree that Australia cannot expect to continue to sell its backyard to China at exorbitant prices. China is putting in place a wide range of sources so they can eventually apply some pressure in the price negotiations.

When and if that happens, who can tell. I’d keep an eye on my resources stocks though …

 

Caixin Online   29/1/2011

Palace of a Thousand Bribes

Sometimes a salary just doesn't cover all the expenses – how the malignant corruption of He Shen became the most egregious example of imperial corruption during the Qing Dynasty

Rising to become Emperor Qianlong's most trusted consort during the late Qing Dynasty, the legend of He Shen continues to live in the minds of many Chinese as a parable of rank official corruption. By the court's own archives of the time, He Shen was documented as having amassed a combined 107.2 million tael in 1799 with his relatives, when his assets were finally confiscated by the central government. The list is recorded in China's First Historical Archives Center, Volume 195.

 

Kaixin OpEd – The other legend on corruption is of the chief adviser to the Emperor in the Qing Dynasty, Kang Xi.

Kang Xi was infamous for his corruption and had amassed a vast fortune.

A trusted adviser to the Emperor asked him why he didn’t do something about it and replace Kang Xi

The Emperor replied that Kang Xi was sated, the wolf was full.

If he appointed someone else, they would be a hungry wolf.

 

The New York Times   29/1/2011

Chasing the China Bandwagon

The United States Business and Industry Council, for example, which represents family-owned domestic manufacturing businesses, argues that President Obama should stop negotiating with China and start imposing taxes and tariffs. “We need to contain China’s economic strength and to reduce China’s military strength,” said Alan Tonelson, research fellow at the council.

Mr. O’Neill, by contrast, points to the rich earnings that multinational companies like I.B.M. are garnering from sharply rising exports to China. “The notion that China grows at everybody else’s expense is at least three years out of date,” he said.

Kaixin OpEd - The 'smart' money - those with intelligence and foresight - see China's rise and rise as an opportunity not a threat to be contained.

The smart money goes to China and actively looks for opportunies.

The smart money looks for opportunities in their own country that can link into the rise and rise of China.

The dull money simply complains and want mommy to fix things ...

 

The Wall Street Journal   29/1/2011

Geithner: Global Inflation ‘Not High on List of Concerns’

Inflation on a global level is “not high on the list of concerns,” even though emerging markets across the world are certainly “feeling some pressure,”  U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said Friday.

Kaixin OpEd – Well, that’s taking responsibility isn’t it?

America unleashes a tidal wave of money into the world banking system to try and fix its own economic woes (woes self inflicted) and couldn’t give a toss about the consequences to any other country.

China is certainly concerned about the tidal wave of counterfeit money heading its way.

China will take steps to stop it.

America will bleat and bleat about unfair economic and commercial practices …. but it is of their doing!!

Actually, there is nothing new in all this ……

 

Asia Times Online   29/1/2011

China labor shortage spreads
By Olivia Chung


Thousands of companies have opened factories away from China's prosperous eastern coastline in order to cut pay costs driven up in part by labor shortages. To their dismay, they are finding in places like Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region similar pay pressures, sometimes having to offer workers better conditions than in rich Guangdong.

Kaixin OpEd – The free ride on the backs of Chinese workers is over it would seem.

This will be reflected in the price Chinese widgets.

That’s OK says the Central Bank of America, well just print some more $US’s to pay for them …

Yikes!

 

Caixin Online   28/1/2011

Tengchong: Ground Zero for Yunnan Land Grab

Via an opaque land-transfer process, villas and a golf club sprouted on property that used to be part of a pretty village

Virtually every major community in China has seen struggles over land for urban expansion that end in overnight success for real estate developers, while village farmers get the short end of the stick.

Now the experience is being repeated in a picturesque corner of southwest China, in the ancient city of Tengchong in Yunnan Province, despite intervention by the central government's Ministry of Land Resources (MLR) and charges that a local developer and town leaders broke the law.

Kaixin OpEd – Our whole world economic model is predicated on growth.

Growth is the transformation of natural resources.

Kaixin expects that a native American or an original inhabitant of Australia would say of many places, “… that used to be part of a pretty village”

The article seems to point the finger at development and wistfully murmur about ‘pretty villages’. However, China is going through an economic transformation the speed of which the world has never seen.

The west went through a similar economic transformation, but it took a couple of hundred years. Along the way many ‘pretty villages’ were destroyed.

Kaixin is all for pretty villages and wonders about this economic model that is holding the world hostage.

But, that is the reality.

Also, when you scratch the surface on many of these stories, you find a different set of facts. Not always, but often.

 

The Wall Street Journal   27/1/2011

China Drunk-Driver Case Hits a Nerve

BEIJING—Chinese prosecutors filed only light charges against a man who police say killed a college student while driving drunk and who witnesses say then tried to use his father's position as a police official to avoid punishment, an incident that has come to symbolize rampant abuse of power among the families of officials.

Kaixin OpEd – The little t..d is probably crying in the photo because he is being punished, not because of remorse for the young women he killed.

The little t..d expected to get away with it, “My father is Li Gang”.

This is a growing problem in China from two sources:

The first is from the only children of government officials, particularly those far away from Beijing. These kids act like the spoilt only children they are and are becoming increasingly out of control.

The second is similar, it is from the only children of the new rich in China. These kids also act like the spoilt only children they are and are also becoming increasingly out of control.

 

Director of Gory Rabbit Revolt Video ‘Just Venting’

The creators of “Greeting Card for the Year of the Rabbit”–a satirical Chinese cartoon about a boy who dreams of violent revolution against a corrupt, abusive government—say they weren’t trying to suggest revolt themselves. They were just venting.

Kaixin OpEd – Venting is good, gory is, in our opinion, bad. The video could have made its point without all that blood and gore. As we said, young people trying to make a point, but failing.

In particular, as a site that covers the news on China daily, Kaixin noted that it played into the hands of those people in the west who want to see the negative in all things Chinese. It was used to ‘hit’ China, which we would hope was not the intent of the makers of the video, who showed little understanding of how the western media works.

Still, as we said, they are young …

Xiaosui asked her friends in China about the video. These friends are all well educated middle class Chinese living in the cities. Only one had bothered to see it and he said it was childish drivel. He said that it went on all the time in China and was nothing of interest.

 

 

China Daily   26/1/2011

Sino-Russian relations key to peace, security

BEIJING - Trade between China and Russia is becoming increasingly interdependent, but the two still need to do more to promote sustainable global development, experts said.

Global economy experts from the two countries took part in a videoconference on Tuesday to discuss Sino-Russian cooperation in the post-financial crisis era.

Meanwhile, China and Russia held their fifth round of strategic security talks in Moscow on Monday, led by State Councilor Dai Bingguo and Russian Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev. The two countries acknowledged that in order to enhance strategic mutual trust and improve the global security situation, the two sides should chart the development of Sino-Russian relations for the next 10 years from a strategic perspective.

As Dai's trip came just days after President Hu Jintao's visit to the United States, it is widely believed that he talked with Russian officials about the results of Hu's visit.

Analysts say Sino-US relations will affect the layout of world politics and that Russia is willing to see stronger Sino-US ties, which will help stabilize its own relationship with Washington.

Kaixin OpEd – Bit ironic that …

In Kaixin’s opinion America approached China in the early 1970’s to prevent just such an alliance.

Yes, and alliance with Russia in the 21st century is different that an alliance with the USSR in the 1970’s.

However, they are two mighty nations with enormous natural and human resources. They adjoin each other geographically.

They do not have a happy history with America.

As we said, bit ironic that …

 

Two New Videos, Two Radically Different China

Two videos in heavy circulation on the Chinese Internet Monday illustrate two starkly different views of modern China. One is a government-sponsored promotional film that portrays a gentle giant of a country, full of happy construction workers and break dancers who are proud of their national transformation, and the other is a short, intensely violent satirical animation about a little boy who dreams of revolution against a corrupt, abusive government.

Kaixin OpEd
– I asked Xiaosui about this video. Her response was that it was childish. It didn’t talk about anything new, all the issues have been discussed and discussed in China and the government has done something positive about each issue.

The video is not only childish, it is foolish.

The video has an unhealthy pre-occupation with violence. Without the ending, it is nothing and would have sunk without trace in China.

If a similar video was made in the west, inciting people to violence against public servants and politicians I would hope it would be taken down. Not because it complains to the government but because some loony tune with a screw loose might take it literally and shoot some poor public servant or politician.

The children in Beijing who made this video have harmed China because it is just the sort of thing the west likes to pick up on: “It was made by Chinese so it must voice the concern of the majority of Chinese.”

It doesn’t,

All in all, not worth wasting any more time over.

A clarification:

Of course the people of China are concerned about the issues raised in the video, as they have been talked about from the ground up since they occurred (without government censorship). The video can also be interpreted as inciting the Chinese people to bloody revolution. Possible, though the average adult in China will have dismissed it as childish drivel. My point was that some looney tune could take it seriously and harm an innocent person.

That actually touches on the issue of violence in video games - games it seems the makers of this video regularly play (haven’t they got better things to do with their time?).

Follow Up Comment ...

‘We in the West want China to evolve now. It’s a process, not an event, and one that is happening while we watch.’

Spot on …

At Kaixin we see it in terms of the colour coming back: unevenly, but insistently.

My wife, Xiaosui, was born in 1966 into the heart of the Cultural Revolution. Her father was a teacher and thrown into prison, the whole family was sent to a prison farm. So Xiaosui knows political oppression intimately.

China was certainly grey then.

She has seen China emerge from all that and come slowly back into the light. She is fiercely proud of China and she is one of the few people I know who has a definite right to hate the Communist Party.

She sees the Cultural Revolution in the context of the time.

To understand what happened and her attitude, you have to understand Deng Xiaoping and his contribution to China.

Yes, both videos reflect the China of today.

My gripe, as the western half of Kaixin, is the same as Xiaosui’s, it is a childish video full of violence. As she said, if they left out that, then it becomes nothing. A video made by young people trying to make a statement, but without the wisdom to do so.

 

The Wall Street Journal   25/1/2011

Trump Swats at China While Teasing Presidential Bid

Donald Trump has once again stepped up with a grand plan to solve the problem of the day. This time, it’s U.S. relations with China.

“These are not our friends. These are our enemies. These are not people that understand niceness,” he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer. “They’re manipulating their currency. Intellectual property rights and everything else are a joke over there. They’re making stuff that you see being sold all the time on Fifth Avenue, copying various, you know, whether it’s Chanel or whatever it may be, the brands, and just selling it ad - ad nauseum. I mean this is a country that is ripping off the United States like nobody other than OPEC has ever done before.”

Kaixin OpEd – Kaixin assumes that Trump is a highly intelligent and informed individual.

So why is he spewing this garbage?

Obviously his researchers have identified a trigger point in the America psyche …. fear of China.

As Kaixin opines often, to the point of tedium, America will not get out of its present economic woes with the mindset of a spoilt teenager.

America has to stop finding someone (some country) to blame and go back to basics: hard work, innovation and using real money, not the forged pieces of toilet paper that Bernanke & Co churn out.

There is a huge depth to America and it is not going anywhere soon, but in Kaixin’s opinion a lazy generation has squandered a huge proportion of its wealth and needs to get back to basics to regain it.

China is an opportunity for America and the world, why not make use of it rather than throw rocks at China.

Still, Trump knows all this, but power is power and that is what he is after.

 

Two New Videos, Two Radically Different Chinas

Two videos in heavy circulation on the Chinese Internet Monday illustrate two starkly different views of modern China. One is a government-sponsored promotional film that portrays a gentle giant of a country, full of happy construction workers and break dancers who are proud of their national transformation, and the other is a short, intensely violent satirical animation about a little boy who dreams of revolution against a corrupt, abusive government.

Kaixin OpEd
– I asked Xiaosui about this video. Her response was that it was childish. It didn’t talk about anything new, all the issues have been discussed and discussed in China and the government has done something positive about each issue.

The video is not only childish, it is foolish.

The video has an unhealthy pre-occupation with violence. Without the ending, it is nothing and would have sunk without trace in China.

If a similar video was made in the west, inciting people to violence against public servants and politicians I would hope it would be taken down. Not because it complains to the government but because some loony tune with a screw loose might take it literally and shoot some poor public servant or politician.

The children in Beijing who made this video have harmed China because it is just the sort of thing the west likes to pick up on: “It was made by Chinese so it must voice the concern of the majority of Chinese.”

It doesn’t,

All in all, not worth wasting any more time over.

A clarification:

Of course the people of China are concerned about the issues raised in the video, as they have been talked about from the ground up since they occurred (without government censorship). The video can also be interpreted as inciting the Chinese people to bloody revolution. Possible, though the average adult in China will have dismissed it as childish drivel. My point was that some looney tune could take it seriously and harm an innocent person.

That actually touches on the issue of violence in video games - games it seems the makers of this video regularly play (haven’t they got better things to do with their time?).

 

 

The New York Times   24/1/2011

Maybe Japan Was Just a Warm-Up

The trade tensions with China sometimes seem like a rerun of the 1980s rivalry with Japan. But can Washington use its old strategies?

The real answer to the China challenge, like the competition from Japan in the 1980s, must come from the United States, the industrial policy thinkers say. A mix of several ingredients will undoubtedly be sought: skillful government policy, smart private-sector strategies, national investment in research and development for long-term innovation, and improved performance of the American education system. In short, all the things the United States should be doing anyway, but with an added measure of urgency because of the global competition that China epitomizes — an economic Sputnik.

Kaixin OpEd - An informed article that is well worth reading.

China is definitely NOT Japan and has approached it rise to economic power in a completely different way. Japan was always hostage to America post WWII. China prised open America in the 1970's and has not looked back.

The author, Steve Lohr, is correct in saying that America has to learn to compete with China and go back to basics. Complaining about the Yuan and crying on Washington's shoulder won't fix the problem of a stagnated economic America.

Steve Lohr is also right in saying that America has a great wealth of talent and energy in its people and corporations. Harness that and America will compete successfully with China.

Rather than see the rise and rise of China as a threat to be controlled, America should see it as an opportunity to compete: compete in business, economics, philosophy and ideals.

America became a great nation because of its ability to embrace competition. It lost a lot of that greatness when it suckled up to mummy's tit (aka GFC) and started to cry like a baby (aka Yuan).

 

Op-Ed Columnist
Banned in Beijing!
By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF


To measure the democratizing effect of the Internet on China, I conducted a little experiment. I survived. But will my blog?

Psst. Don’t tell the Chinese government, but I started a Chinese-language blog here in China, and it contains counterrevolutionary praise of dissidents. It’s at http://blog.sina.com.cn/jisidao.

Kaixin OpEd - Kaixin had a peek and got this message:

抱歉,您要访问的页面不存在或被删除!'Sorry, the page you want to access does not exist or is deleted!'

Perhaps Mr Kristof would like to publish what he wrote in the Blog.

Censorship is a tricky issue in China. Kaixin has learned that it is not black and white like a second rate American western, it is complex and the rationale behind it is at times obscure.

Still, it is an issue well known in China and probably worth discussing from time to time.

Though, in the final analysis, it is the people of China who have the right to decide, not the west.

 

The Wall Street Journal   22/1/2011

Chinese Shoppers Hitting Their Stride?

Americans shop. Chinese people save. That, at least, has been the lesson of the U.S.-China economic relationship, one borne out by a $250 billion trade gap and China’s roughly $900 billion in U.S. Treasury holdings. But a new study suggests things are changing.

Kaixin OpEd – If you believe, ‘Americans shop. Chinese people save.’ then you haven’t been to China lately.

Indeed, you don’t understand the Chinese.

Yes, they save, but they LOVE to shop.

Surely it is more prudent to spend less on shopping than you earn. The ‘west’, Americans in particular’, had a great big party thrown by Greenspan and spent far more then they earned and, for many, far more then they were worth.

That went for countries, States, Local Councils, Corporations …

Hence, the GFC.

The Chinese just increased their shopping as their incomes went up ….. but they made sure they saved a little as well.

Hence, for China, no GFC.

As China’s wealth increases you will have around 1.4 billion people who love to shop.

This may come as a surprise to many in the ‘west’ …. but that is an opportunity, not a threat.


(This OpEd is dedicated to my friend Hong Ying - who has turned shopping into an art form)

See Kaixin's - INSIGHTS INTO CHINA'S SOCIETY & CULTURE

 

Shanghai Resorts to Property Tax to Stem Prices

SHANGHAI—Shanghai's mayor on Friday said the city will impose a controversial tax on property, a move by China's richest city that may be rolled out nationally as authorities scout for new ways to cool housing prices.

Kaixin OpEd – The issue with rising residential real estate prices is that the average person is soon priced out of the market. It creates an artificial divide in a society.

In America, prices were going up and up in all sorts of places and Greenspan simply did not understand the problem….. bit of a worry that.

Then, President Bush (Jnr), taking a leaf from Greenspan's book of Economic Management - titled, 'One trick pony' - decided to give everyone free money so they could buy their own house. No credit checks, no ability to repay the loan … just free money.

What was that about the way to hell being paved by good intentions …

Greenspan was still confused, but he knew a good con when he saw it, so he let the dogs from Wall Street gorge themselves on that morsel of economic incompetence.

The result, massive inflation of house prices followed by the GFC.

It all made matters worse.

People were being thrown out of their houses.

China is taking a different approach.

They are not flooding the country with cheap money.

They are lending prudently (mostly).

They are finding ways to control the price of residential real estate, of which this tax is one.

They are trying to ensure that the average person can afford to purchase a house and not let the artificial divide between rich and poor based on house prices become too great.

That is what America did in the past, under competent Central Bankers. That is what kept house prices in check. That is what made a fairer society in America.

Think about it …

(and yes, economists will point to all sorts of little niggles in the above, but I suggest that the basis of the observations are correct)

See Kaixin's - CHINA REAL ESTATE

 

Asia Times Online   21/1/2011

SINOGRAPH
Confucius takes a stand
By Francesco Sisci


Chinese authorities last week placed a statue of Confucius in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, near the portrait of former paramount leader Mao Zedong. The move to give such a public face to the great philosopher is in line with Beijing's decision to cut down on Maoist paraphernalia in the political heart of China. Maoists are up in arms.

See Kaixin's - Confucius, Traditional Chinese Medicine ... best represent Chinese culture

See Kaixin's - Confucius - Video Documentary

See Kaixin's - Mao’s Last Swimmer - Chairman Mao's swim anniversary Nanning China

Kaixin OpEd – Xiaosui recalls the Cultural Revolution (which she lived through) and how Mao wanted to wipe Confucius from Chinese history.

Why?

Mao came from a village in rural China. He had seen how lofty ideas such as Confucianism had not benefited the rural population and peasants of China one jot.

He wanted to leave all that behind and forge a new China.

Yes, his ideals were corrupted by power, but the Cultural Revolution was actually founded on a sound idea, to rid China of the old ways that had contributed to grinding the average rural worker/farmer into the dust.

However, an idea, a philosophy, as strong as Confucianism cannot be wiped from the face of history.

It is re-emerging in China as China is taking its place in the world as a leading power. A place it held for most of recorded history.

The leaders of China know that the Chinese people, in particular the youth, need a powerful philosophy to guide them.

The influences and temptations of China’s re-gained wealth are great, and distracting.

Communism is a strong philosophy, but it is mainly political and economic. Also, China has let it evolve to benefit the needs of China, rather than wear it as a straightjacket.

Confucianism has 1,000’s of years of history in moral guidance.

Communism may provide the physical sustenance to the people of China, however Confucianism will provide the philosophical sustenance.

 

Global Times - Demented art

As a child, Guo Haiping witnessed his disturbed brother Guo Enping being dispatched to a mental hospital after reading The Selected Works of Mao Zedong nonstop for three days and three nights.

Kaixin OpEd - This article featured on the front page of one of China's leading overseas English newwspapers (news website). Along with the statue, it says something of how China is viewing Mao's legacy. Not all bad, but in perspective.

See Kaixin's - Mao’s Last Swimmer - Chairman Mao's swim anniversary Nanning China

 

Caixin Online   21/1/2011

Plans for Property Trusts Put on Ice

A lawyer close to regulators told Caixin that the State Council postponed the launch of REITs to coordinate property market policies

(Beijing) - After a long road riddled with twists and turns, the much anticipated launch of the Chinese version of Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) has been suspended, Caixin learned from various sources.

"Research on the plan for REITs was halted around late September and early October," a finance official from a local government told Caixin. However, a source close to the central regulator said that plans to go through with a Chinese version of REITs still exists, but that significant work still needs to be done on reviewing implementation and regulation by high-level government agencies.

Kaixin OpEd – This picture is a good example of what is driving real estate in China.

It is simple supply and demand.

Huge demand, limited supply.

Combined with a subtle change in attitude from paying cash for everything, to borrowing.

It is not, as many commentators and economists in the west think, driven by a Wall Street Ponzi scheme.

 

China Daily   21/1/2011

China expected to be top tourist destination

MADRID - UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) Secretary General Taleb Rifai said Thursday he expected China to become the world's largest tourist destination within five to seven years.

Kaixin OpEd – That makes perfect sense to Kaixin. China is largely un-explored by western tourists, yet it has an almost unlimited wealth of natural beauty and culture to be explored.

Instead of making widgets and selling them to the west, people from the west will come to China and spend their money there.

That will boost domestic consumption.

And so it goes …

 

China Daily   20/1/2011

China, US need co-op to solve trade imbalance: Chinese minister

WASHINGTON -- China is willing to work with the United States on the imbalance of bilateral trade through communication and cooperation, Chinese Commerce Minister Chen Deming said Wednesday.

Trade imbalance is indeed "an important issue that the two sides need to have a correct perception of," Chen told reporters during Chinese President Hu Jintao's ongoing state visit to the United States.

Responding to a question that linked the trade imbalance with China's currency RMB, Chen said the two issues are irrelevant.

"I have read a lot of comments by many US think tanks and members of US Congress. They believed there should be a major RMB appreciation because of the trade imbalance between the two nations," he said.

"According to Western economics theories, currency will have an impact on the overall export of a nation. But if it is just about trade surplus or deficit between two countries, then it is not a matter of currency. Rather, it is something about trade barriers, trade liberalization and trade facilitation, which both countries need to sit down and talk about," he said.

China's trade surplus totaled 183.1 billion US dollars in 2010, of which 181.3 billion dollars was gained from the United States, meaning the Sino-UStrade imbalance has nothing to do with the currency, as China barely had a surplus with other trading partners, Chen said.

He listed three major reasons for the huge surplus.

First, part of that surplus comes from the trade surplus originally held by other countries and regions against the United States. This is a result of the globalization process.

Second, the United States still holds trade discrimination against China.

"The United States bans military items export to China and also subjects military-civilian dual-use items to very rigorous restrictions," Chen said.

Currently China is the third largest export market for the United States, and China's imports from the country is expected to further grow as it continues to implement an import stimulus policy this year. However, China is excluded from the Obama administration's list of countries and regions to which US export control will be eased, he said.

"This is apparently not in the interests of American companies and workers," Chen said. "We hope the United States could change such policy and readdress the trade imbalance between the two countries."

Third, there were some misalignments in trade statistics that both sides are currently working together to reconcile.

"We believe we should discuss the trade issues in an atmosphere of mutual trust and equality. Only in this way can we find a better solution to the issue," he said.

The minister, currently accompanying Chinese President Hu Jintao on a four-day state visit to the United States, said multi-billion deals between the two countries will be signed during Hu's visit, including Chinese purchases of US products worth a total of 24.9 billion dollars, which testifies to the importance of Sino-US trade relations.

Kaixin OpEd – Kaixin has observed for some time that China is challenging the assumptions of the western economists.

Particularly the ones that say it is: “Basic Economics 101”

Rather, China is evolving ‘Basic Economics Yi Ling Yi’ – Economics with Chinese Characteristics.

Therefore, Kaixin was interested to see the comment by Chinese Commerce Minister Chen Deming, "According to Western economics theories …”

We shall see, we shall see …

 

The Age   18/1/2011

China's military a fragmented beast
John Garnaut


For better or for worse, even the formidable Chinese Communist Party is not finding it easy to maintain its dictatorship after the end of communism and beyond the lives of its founding revolutionaries.

Kaixin OpEd - An interesting article from someone who is on the ground. Is he seeing the real China that Kaixin is missing? China is a complex dragon and in the mix you will find the good, the bad and the ugly ...

Kaixin will stay with its focus for trying to present a positive China, while directing criticism where we think it is warranted - towards China & the 'west'.

 

 

The New York Times   17/1/2011

Solar Panel Maker Moves Work to China

BEIJING — Aided by at least $43 million in assistance from the government of Massachusetts and an innovative solar energy technology, Evergreen Solar emerged in the last three years as the third-largest maker of solar panels in the United States.

But now the company is closing its main American factory, laying off the 800 workers by the end of March and shifting production to a joint venture with a Chinese company in central China. Evergreen cited the much higher government support available in China.

Evergreen Solar plans to close its main American factory, in Devens, Mass., seen here in September, and lay off 800 workers.

 

Kaixin OpEd – Surely the focus should be on producing clean green energy for the world.

America used to crow and crow about the benefits of re-locating their major corporations to anywhere in the world that offered a competitive advantage. It was capitalism writ large they yelled from the roof-tops.

Low wages?? … who cares!

Child labour?? …. who cares!

Environmental degradation … who cares!

Now America complains and wants to take its bat and ball and go home. These pesky Chinese are really serious about producing clean green energy.

American politicians just like to talk about it.

And you will find the wages in China are indeed fair. You will not find any child labour. Now, you will not find environmental degradation from the new industries, China is addressing what it acknowledges is a real issue in China.

So perhaps America and it corporations would like to dust off their capitalist credentials and compete.

Perhaps American politicians could become serious about supporting clean green industries .... oh, I forgot, they squandered America's wealth ..... woops .....

See Kaixin's - GREEN CHINA

 

The Wall Street Journal   17/1/2011

Hu Takes Confident Tone on Inflation

BEIJING—Chinese President Hu Jintao voiced confidence in the government's ability to fight inflation, following a central bank move to curb lending that economists think is the first of what's likely to be a series of further tightening measures this year.

Kaixin OpEd – Contrast what China’s Central Bank is doing to control inflation and what America’s Central Bank did under Greenspan and now Bernanke.

First, the clever western economists decided that house prices should not count as a measure of inflation. After all, if the price of your house goes up then you are simply becoming richer….. right??

WRONG!

If you only own one house then the only thing to change is the cost of running the house, in fact you have become less wealthy.

If you own more than one house, then indeed you have become richer, as long as you can capitalise and use the increase in the price of the house.

Most people only own one house and the flip side is that it all becomes artificial and makes it harder for the next generation to get into a house.

Greenspan let loose the dogs of greed in the American banking system by de-regulating the industry and turning it into a gambling casino, with the inevitable consequences.

President Bush, in a misguided desire to see everyone in America owning their own house, mandated Freddie & Fannie to lend money to anyone who wanted a house irrespective of whether they could afford it or not, with the inevitable consequences.

It was like a particularly nasty virus that was then spread throughout the world by the clever things on Wall Street who packaged the dud real estate loans and sold them throughout the world; all with the stamp of approval from Moody’s and S&P (these institutions now run around the world trying to look like serious economists instead of the Wall Street Carpet Baggers they really are).

Problem? Easy says Greenspan and his acolyte, Bernanke, open the spigots and flood the world with free money.

That works until it doesn’t.

You can only blow a balloon up so far, and then it bursts.

It’s called inflation and part of the mix is house prices.

So China’s central bank is keeping control of the banking system and draining money out of the system and pricing it correctly.

China’s central bank and the government are making sure that real estate loans only go to people who can afford them.

The government is addressing the issue by increasing the supply of land, making it hard to impossible to own more than one property, taxing the gains from any increase in the price of an investment property.

In China, the increase in the price of residential real estate is mainly fuelled by demand, not by magic tricks.

That is why President Hu is confident. He has a responsible central bank and a tightly regulated banking system.

See Kaixin's - ECONOMIC CHINA

 

The Wall Street Journal   15/1/2011

Clinton Urges China to Embrace Reform

WASHINGTON—Just days ahead of Chinese President Hu Jintao's visit to Washington, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Friday urged China to improve its human rights policies and to accept more responsibility as a global leader.

Ms. Clinton's comments on human rights highlight a sore point for Beijing that may be exacerbated next week when a political dissident and former jailed Tiananmen Square protester takes center stage in the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Kaixin Oped – The lack of understanding and miss-conceptions that abound around the Tiananmen Square incident of 1989 never cease to amaze Kaixin.
    
Time and space do not permit a lengthy OpEd on the issue, however Kaixin is trying to find the time to pen an article on the 3 Tiananmens (yes 3).

The west fixated on some ripples on the surface of a very deep river. The west, from what Kaixin has researched, knows little-nothing of what was going on in the deep river, beneath the ripples.

Kaixin does not hope to change any minds from the article, indeed, Kaixin will undoubtedly be derided. ….. lighting a match in a gale does have its limitations.

 

U.S. Is Not Trying to Contain China, Clinton Says

WASHINGTON — The United States is not bent on containing China, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday, but the Obama administration is cultivating other allies across Asia to help it manage Beijing’s increasingly bold projection of military and economic power.

Kaixin OpEd – What a contradiction – America is not trying to contain China but is cultivating allies because of China’s rising economic and military power.

Hillary, dear, little one …. why do you need allies if you are not trying to contain China? Now, re-write your composition and try to get at least some of the logic right.

 

Global Times   14/1/2011

Professor battles one-child policy

A Beijing law professor, who was fined for contravening the one-child policy by having a second child, is suing local family planning authorities in an attempt to promote the need to have the policy revised, if not scrapped altogether.

Yang Zhizhu, 44, an assistant professor at China Youth University for Political Sciences, was suspended from his teaching position in April 2010 after it was discovered his wife had given birth to a second child in December 2009.

In September, the Haidian District population and family planning commission fined him 240,642 yuan ($36,300) for "illegally having a second child."

Consequently, his second child is unable to obtain a hukou (household registration).

"Without a hukou, she is not entitled to go to school, find a job or get married," Yang claimed.

Kaixin Oped - Kaixin's stance on the one-child policy is clear, we support it as we see no other viable alternative that would have addressed the rampant population growth leading up to 1980, a result of Mao's miss-guided policy to populate, populate, populate ...

Therefore, we see Professor Yang's stance as selfish. Although, it is always good to question and debate State Policy from time to time

 

China's Dreams of Superior Children

WSJ 2/1/2011

Deng Xiaoping was inspired by social Darwinist ideas of China's leading scientists to create the one-child policy.

Susan Greenhalgh, professor of anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, starts out by attacking the West's "master narrative" about the one-child policy: A cruel communist state suppresses the reproductive desires of the Chinese people. Then she proceeds to show that this is an accurate reading of the reality.

Kaixin OpEd – As a Professor of Anthropology, Ms Greenhalgh’s opinions deserve respect.

There is always an assumption both by the academic concerned and the general public that the said academic is objective, does not bring a personal agenda to an issue.

This is, of course, patent nonsense.

Academics have a tendency to be … well … academic.

They are also human; they also have their biases, pet theories and foibles.

All the people that Kaixin talks to in China, yes all, support the one-child policy. These are the average people ‘on the street’. Some have born the brunt on the policy, but still support it.

What arrogance to believe that an ‘outsider’ knows better.

It stems, of course, from an ignorance of day-to-day life in China.

Kaixin, both Chinese and Western, is immersed in that day-to-day life.

Professor Greenhalgh is someone is also reported to be deeply immersed in China. Kaixin must give her the benefit of the doubt. She walks the streets and talks to the people, Kaixin assumes.

Kaixin notes that Professor Greenhalgh did a fair amount of her research in rural China:  ‘She is well-acquainted with China, where she has done much rural research.’  See above for Kaixin’s OpEd on City China v Rural China.

I have not done research on this issue (eugenics), but I do know a lot about Deng Xiaoping and so do the people in China we speak to.

Kaixin believes that Professor Greengage is gazing into academic dark spaces when she opines that the one-child policy had its gestation in eugenics.

If she sees the people of China as grey ‘automon’s’ of the State then she is not looking in the right places – see para above.

Yes, the one-child policy has had, at times, tragic consequences. However perhaps it is best to consider what would be the consequence of unbridled population growth in China, as per Mao’s exhortation to populate, populate, populate (the 3 populates Kaixin calls it.).

Perhaps the tragic consequences would be more, not less.

Something to consider from an academic dark space …

Having penned the above, Western Kaixin bought it to China Kaixin’s attention and asked for a comment.

When she stopped laughing, Xiaosui got angry.

She is heartily sick of the way the western press portrays China as an errant child, led by evil people. The errant child incapable of questioning those leaders.

Xiaosui was born in 1966 into the heart of the Cultural Revolution. Her family was labelled as ‘black’ and her father, a teacher, was sent to a prison farm with his whole family. There is little you can tell Xiaosui about political oppression.

Mao had control and the people’s voice was lost during those dark years.

Many in the west still see China that way, so they readily believe people like Professor Greenhalgh.

Since 1979 when Deng Xiaoping took effective power, China has steadily come into the light. As Kaixin puts it, ‘… the colour is coming back : unevenly but insistently.’

Xiaosui’s sister was in the first wave of women who came under the one-child policy. Xiaosui was, of course, subject to it. As is her brother.

All of Xiaosui’s family, friends and acquaintances were or are subject to it.

They all support it.

Kaixin is also, ‘well-connected in China’.

They are all middle-class, not rural.

Does Professor Greenhalgh’s observations only apply to the country people?

Is her ‘conspiracy’ theory true?

Did Deng Xiaoping unleash ‘eugenics’ onto an un-suspecting China?

Xiaosui is torn between laughing and shouting at this notion.

She points out that if the basis was to give an edge to the city then why did Deng Xiaoping change the policy shortly after it was implemented to allow rural families to have two children. Somewhat undermines the eugenic story, don’t you think?

She also points out that before Mao rural families had many children because so many died in the appalling conditions of rural life in China at that time. It was necessary to give birth to as many children as possible so that enough would survive to help with the work and look after the parents in their old age.

Mao’s policies did many terrible things to China, but not all. Rural health improved considerably. More and more children survived and people began to live longer.

What did not change was the age old thinking to have as many children as possible.

When Deng Xiaoping took the reigns in China, the rural population was exploding and unsustainable.

I would have thought this was basic anthropological research.

India has not addressed this issue, but it must at some time.

There is often an assumption, looking back, that if we had only taken a different path then things would have been better.

This is unknown. Things could have been better, they could have been worse.

China took an effective path to control its population. It had its tragic consequences and will continue to throw up unexpected consequences and problems.

However, why assume that an alternative, to do nothing, would have been better. Perhaps Professor Greenhalgh has thought of the solution, if only Beijing would listen to her opining from her lofty academic perch.

Kaixin suggests that in all alternatives there would be huge and unexpected challenges bringing their own tragic consequences.

China relaxed the policy in rural China almost immediately. It is now considering relaxing the policy in the cities.

Xiaosui got angry because of the negative way Professor Greenhalgh’s observations are reported in the WSJ.

She says that the Chinese people are happy to engage in dialectic based on mutual respect. The western media so often takes an ill-informed, patronising approach which is more than starting to rankle in China.

 

The New York Times   13/1/2011

Shift of Values for the Children of Post-1980 Affluent China

Those of the post-'80s generation grew up in different circumstances than their parents, and have different values and attitudes.

Kaixin OpEd - An insightful article that shines a light on the first generation to truly benefit from China's rise & rise. Bear in mind that they will soon be the leaders in China.

Kaixin is closely associated with this generation and agrees with the observations in the article.

 

The Wall Street Journal   12/1/2011

China Stealth Test Upstages Gates, Hu

BEIJING—China's first test flight of its stealth fighter Tuesday overshadowed a mission to China by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates to repair frayed military relations, and prompted concern about whether President Hu Jintao and the civilian leadership are fully in control of the increasingly powerful armed forces.

Kaixin OpEd – Oh, for heaven’s sake …

An amateur video of the test flight (in China!, get real) ….. the flight takes place during a visit of Def Sec Gates … President Hu did not know (well, possbily, Chinese politics is both subtle and hard-nosed, and, there is a new president to be chosen) ….

It’s all a conspiracy by the PLA ….

Kaixin thinks it is China gently telling America that it is not the only kid with bright new toys any more, or the capacity to develop them from scratch.

There is also, perhaps, a subtle message about Korea in there as well.

To change the metaphor … the world does not need an eagle and an angry panda bear fighting in the China shop …. too much would be broken.

 

Caixin Online   11/1/2011

Grisly Road Death Leaves Village in Disbelief

Villagers who rallied around the body of land defender Qian Yunhui now question a local government's credibility

Official reports say former Zhaiqiao village chief Qian Yunhui died accidentally while crossing a road. But villagers say he died December 25 after being forced by five police officers to lie in front of a rolling truck.

Kaixin OpEd - Kaixin sees time and again the people of China standing up and demanding their rights. True reform in this area will come from the people of China, it cannot be imposed by the 'west'.

 

The Wall Street Journal   11/1/2011

U.S. Steel Maker Frames China Building Change

A U.S. metal processor is betting China can be convinced to add a little flexibility to its famously rigid rules on housing construction.

Columbus, Ohio-based Worthington Industries Inc. last week announced plans for a joint venture that will build plants in China to make lighter, more environmentally friendly construction steel aimed at China’s residential construction market.

Kaixin OpEd – China’s rise has taken many people in the west by surprise.

2008 was China’s coming out party and the world went ….. yikes!

Now things are settling down and it is starting to be seen as an opportunity rather than a threat.

Not without its problems, not without its issues ….. but on balance, an opportunity, as this American firm has realised.

See Kaixin's - ECONOMIC CHINA

 

 

China Daily   11/1/2011

Sino-US militaries seek to 'reduce miscalculation'

BEIJING - China and the United States on Monday agreed to jointly reduce the risk of "miscalculation" between the two powerful armed forces, as they restore military ties frayed by a massive US arms deal to Taiwan a year ago.

See Kaixins - Where to now America? + CHINA & TAIWAN

 

The Wall Street Journal   8/1/2011

EU Aims to Seal Deal With Beijing

Chinese leaders are stepping up their courtship of cash-strapped European countries such as Spain, pledging to buy their bonds and expand business ties. Yet China watchers caution that despite the warm diplomacy, Beijing won't save the euro zone.

Kaixin OpEd – It’s interesting isn’t it ….

America and its top shot economists got the world into the GFC. China is getting the world out of the GFC.

Yes, it’s an economic opportunity for China.

But why is that?

Think about it.

Which county was prudent and saved trillions of dollars. Which country squandered its wealth and handed over its economic destiny to the Wall Street spivs.

See Kaixin's - 'Tai Gui le' by Graeme

See Kaixin's - ECONOMIC CHINA

 

Maehara Has a Lesson for China

Japan’s foreign minister issued a veiled call for China to pursue democratic changes, citing Indonesia as a country that has earned respect by electing its president and allowing freedom of speech.

Kaixin Oped – Japan’s militant FM has probably worked out that it is far too early for democracy in China. A democratic China would be weakened, which would suite Maehara.

The relationship between China and Japan is fraught and not helped by the likes of Maehara.

See – Nanking Nanking (Japan has never formally recognised that crime and people like Maehara still worship at the shrine of the war criminals that perpetrated it)

 

The New York Times   7/11/2011

China and U.S. Have ‘Useful’ Talks on North Korea

BEIJING — On the heels of a North Korean plea for negotiations to end the crisis on the Korean Peninsula, Obama administration envoys central to stalled six-party talks met Thursday with their Chinese counterparts, and one said he was hopeful that serious talks on North Korea would begin soon.

Kaixin OpEd – Kaixin would like to see a cartoon of the archetypal Uncle Sam sitting opposite a Panda Bear. They each have a glove puppet, Uncle Sam’s clearly South Korean and the Panda Bear’s clear North Korean.

The puppets are going through the motions but it is Uncle Sam and the Panda Bear who are the ventriloquists.

 

I.H.T. Op-Ed Contributor   7/1/2011
China's North Korean Calculations

China has several geostrategic and social reasons for supporting North Korea.

Selig S. Harrison is director of the Asia program at the Center for International Policy and author of “Korean Endgame.”

Kaixin OpEd - An informed and interesting article

 

The Wall Street Journal   7/1/2011

Failed EU Bid Deals Another Blow to Beijing

BRUSSELS—A Chinese firm Thursday dropped its $1.3 billion offer for Dutch cable-wire maker, dealing another setback to Beijing's efforts to acquire European companies in key industrial sectors—and a sign that Chinese investment in Europe is taking on heightened political sensitivity.

The decision came as European Union's industry commissioner, Antonio Tajani, stepped up his campaign to give the EU the power to block foreign takeover attempts.

"I am totally against protectionism—Chinese, Russian, Brazilian, American investment, the door is open," Mr. Tajani told reporters at the French Finance Ministry in Paris. "But we have to make sure it's not a front for ...

Kaixin OpEd - Have you seen what China is doing in Europe lately? Buying bonds, lots of bonds and investing where it can. Saying no to your friendly invstment banker is not a good option. Particularly if you have suffered a bout of GFC.

See Kaixin's - ECONOMIC CHINA

 

China Daily   7/1/2011

Report: Smoking industry harming economic health

Cost of addiction rising as experts seek efforts to eradicate it

BEIJING - Lost productivity from smoking-related health problems will hamper China's economic growth, and related costs incurred by smoking far exceed the tobacco industry's contribution in terms of profits and jobs it generates, an international panel of experts warned on Thursday.

They also warned that China's addiction to huge revenues from the State-owned tobacco monopoly is hindering anti-smoking measures, potentially costing millions of lives in the country with the world's largest number of smokers.

The warnings, issued in a report prepared by a group of prominent public health experts and economists, came amid growing calls for the government to give stronger support to tobacco-control measures.

Kaixin OpEd – Smoking is pervasive in China and there is no culture of non-smoking. Laws to stop smoking will not be effective until the culture changes.

This was, and still is the case in the west.

Laws have to be policed even if there is a culture of non-smoking. In the west there is social approbation if a person smokes in a non-smoking area. Also, there is a significant number, if not a majority of males who do not smoke.

This is not the case in China. It is hard for a business to enforce a no smoking law as it will result in a loss of business. Spending and the decision where to spend is still largely in the hands of males. A business owner would get no support from his customers. The police are very busy and this probably seems like a non-issue to them.

So it is back to changing the culture of smoking.

People in the west must surely know just how hard that is. There is no logic in smoking, there is no advertising in the west - indeed the pictures on the packets are gruesome - yet millions of young people take it up every year.

My favourite was from my Chinese son who tried smoking a little while ago at the age of 15. He told me in all earnestness that it would be OK to smoke in China because Chinese cigarettes do not give you lung cancer.

Go figure ….

 

Smoking cost outweighs benefits

BEIJING - A new report said Thursday that the medical and economic costs of smoking-related diseases in China had outweighed the financial benefits provided to the country by the tobacco industry.

The reduction in the number of smokers in China has been negligible, said the report, "Tobacco Control and China's Future," by Yang Gonghuan, deputy head of the Chinese Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Hu Angang, head of the Center for China Studies of Tsinghua University.

The report identified China's tobacco industry as the major culprit for the stalled tobacco control efforts in the country.

Kaixin OpEd - This will come as no surprise to people in the west.

 

The Wall Street Journal   4/1/2011

Architects Push Rezoning Of Over-Planned Cities

To accommodate ballooning populations, Chinese urban planners are building super-zoned residential enclaves. But as they have raced to shelter the masses, policymakers have forgotten to build them actual neighborhoods.

Kaixin OpEd – The older compounds of apartments are like small villages. There is a strong sense of community at you walk around. The new ones are simply high rises, although many of the ones Kaixin has visited do have community facilities.

The question, Kaixin supposes, is how do you accommodate the huge influx of people into the cities.

Going up is one way, going out is another. Both have their problems.

It is an issue Kaixin suspects that has been discussed at length in the schools of architecture at Chinese universities.

Kaixin was interested to note an article in the China Daily that talked about people in the cities starting to look at the country as a better lifestyle choice.

That is a change of thinking that heralds an epoch in China.

Western Kaixin at first was puzzled by the thinking in China where the city dwellers definitely look down on the rural dwellers.

It is the opposite to way of thinking in the west that tends to romanticise the rural.

So, if the urban becomes too crowded in China then perhaps that way of thinking will change and there will be flow of people to the country. Thus taking the pressure of the cities.

Given the focus on rural China for economic growth, that way of thinking will become more viable as jobs and opportunities in rural China become more abundant and prosperity brings about a more robust society.

See Kaixin's - INSIGHTS INTO CHINA'S SOCIETY & CULTURE

 

The Wall Street Journal   3/1/2011

Wall Street Warms to China Story

Visiting China was considered an indulgence for most financial executives just a few years ago.

But when Berkshire Hathaway Inc.'s Warren Buffett, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co.'s James Dimon, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co.'s Henry Kravis and Carlyle Group's David Rubenstein all visited China in recent months, the trips were seen as something else entirely: crucial steps to keep their respective companies growing.

China has been important to global economic growth for years, of course.

That's all changing. China is opening its markets, slightly loosening the reins on its currency, and is emerging as a key to the future of almost every Wall Street firm.

Kaixin Oped – There is a lot of money in China and a lot of people who want to spend money.

China still has the historical divide between country and city.

In the ‘west’ ‘rural’ is seen as a sort of utopia.

In China ‘ rural’ has been, and still is to a large extent, seen as banishment.

City in China meant education and a high standard of living. Rural in China meant poverty and a subsistence standard of living.

Xiaosui and western Kaixin talk about Mao in this context. Mao came from the country. As western Kaixin has come to understand China a little more he is starting to understand Mao’s policies as particularly ‘country China’. He now quips, “You can take the boy out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the boy.”

Just a thought …

The first thirty years of China’s transformation was accomplished in the cities, rural was left behind. Indeed, rural China provided much of the labour for this economic transformation.

That was a necessary focus, and it has been spectacularly successful.

Over the last 10 years or so that focus has been slowly changing to rural China. Indeed the economic transformation of rural China is one of the central planks of the next 5 year plan.

If the cities are the head of the dragon, then rural China is the body of the dragon, and a big fat dragon it is.

Kaixin has opined before that the economic and entrepreneurial potential within rural China is enormous. It will drive the other major change of focus in China well into the 21st century; from an export driven, and dependent, economy to one focused on domestic consumption, throwing off the shackles of that export dependence.

The spending power of city China is enormous, now.

The spending power of rural and city China, the head and body of the dragon, is almost un-imaginable.

That is why the powerful CEO’s are heading to China. They are not powerful CEO’s for nothing.

They have vision.

 

China's Dreams of Superior Children

Deng Xiaoping was inspired by social Darwinist ideas of China's leading scientists to create the one-child policy.

Susan Greenhalgh, professor of anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, starts out by attacking the West's "master narrative" about the one-child policy: A cruel communist state suppresses the reproductive desires of the Chinese people. Then she proceeds to show that this is an accurate reading of the reality.

Kaixin OpEd – As a Professor of Anthropology, Ms Greenhalgh’s opinions deserve respect.

There is always an assumption both by the academic concerned and the general public that the said academic is objective, does not bring a personal agenda to an issue.

This is, of course, patent nonsense.

Academics have a tendency to be … well … academic.

They are also human; they also have their biases, pet theories and foibles.

All the people that Kaixin talks to in China, yes all, support the one-child policy. These are the average people ‘on the street’. Some have born the brunt on the policy, but still support it.

What arrogance to believe that an ‘outsider’ knows better.

It stems, of course, from an ignorance of day-to-day life in China.

Kaixin, both Chinese and Western, is immersed in that day-to-day life.

Professor Greenhalgh is someone is also reported to be deeply immersed in China. Kaixin must give her the benefit of the doubt. She walks the streets and talks to the people, Kaixin assumes.

Kaixin notes that Professor Greenhalgh did a fair amount of her research in rural China:  ‘She is well-acquainted with China, where she has done much rural research.’  See above for Kaixin’s OpEd on City China v Rural China.

I have not done research on this issue (eugenics), but I do know a lot about Deng Xiaoping and so do the people in China we speak to.

Kaixin believes that Professor Greengage is gazing into academic dark spaces when she opines that the one-child policy had its gestation in eugenics.

If she sees the people of China as grey ‘automon’s’ of the State then she is not looking in the right places – see para above.

Yes, the one-child policy has had, at times, tragic consequences. However perhaps it is best to consider what would be the consequence of unbridled population growth in China, as per Mao’s exhortation to populate, populate, populate (the 3 populates Kaixin calls it.).

Perhaps the tragic consequences would be more, not less.

Something to consider from an academic dark space …

Having penned the above, Western Kaixin bought it to China Kaixin’s attention and asked for a comment.

When she stopped laughing, Xiaosui got angry.

She is heartily sick of the way the western press portrays China as an errant child, led by evil people. The errant child incapable of questioning those leaders.

Xiaosui was born in 1966 into the heart of the Cultural Revolution. Her family was labelled as ‘black’ and her father, a teacher, was sent to a prison farm with his whole family. There is little you can tell Xiaosui about political oppression.

Mao had control and the people’s voice was lost during those dark years.

Many in the west still see China that way, so they readily believe people like Professor Greenhalgh.

Since 1979 when Deng Xiaoping took effective power, China has steadily come into the light. As Kaixin puts it, ‘… the colour is coming back : unevenly but insistently.’

Xiaosui’s sister was in the first wave of women who came under the one-child policy. Xiaosui was, of course, subject to it. As is her brother.

All of Xiaosui’s family, friends and acquaintances were or are subject to it.

They all support it.

Kaixin is also, ‘well-connected in China’.

They are all middle-class, not rural.

Does Professor Greenhalgh’s observations only apply to the country people?

Is her ‘conspiracy’ theory true?

Did Deng Xiaoping unleash ‘eugenics’ onto an un-suspecting China?

Xiaosui is torn between laughing and shouting at this notion.

She points out that if the basis was to give an edge to the city then why did Deng Xiaoping change the policy shortly after it was implemented to allow rural families to have two children. Somewhat undermines the eugenic story, don’t you think?

She also points out that before Mao rural families had many children because so many died in the appalling conditions of rural life in China at that time. It was necessary to give birth to as many children as possible so that enough would survive to help with the work and look after the parents in their old age.

Mao’s policies did many terrible things to China, but not all. Rural health improved considerably. More and more children survived and people began to live longer.

What did not change was the age old thinking to have as many children as possible.

When Deng Xiaoping took the reigns in China, the rural population was exploding and unsustainable.

I would have thought this was basic anthropological research.

India has not addressed this issue, but it must at some time.

There is often an assumption, looking back, that if we had only taken a different path then things would have been better.

This is unknown. Things could have been better, they could have been worse.

China took an effective path to control its population. It had its tragic consequences and will continue to throw up unexpected consequences and problems.

However, why assume that an alternative, to do nothing, would have been better. Perhaps Professor Greenhalgh has thought of the solution, if only Beijing would listen to her opining from her lofty academic perch.

Kaixin suggests that in all alternatives there would be huge and unexpected challenges bringing their own tragic consequences.

China relaxed the policy in rural China almost immediately. It is now considering relaxing the policy in the cities.

Xiaosui got angry because of the negative way Professor Greenhalgh’s observations are reported in the WSJ.

She says that the Chinese people are happy to engage in dialectic based on mutual respect. The western media so often takes an ill-informed, patronising approach which is more than starting to rankle in China.



Addressing some points made in the WSJ Article:

 ‘ When Deng Xiaoping took charge of population control in the early 1980s, he was inspired not by Maoist ideology but rather by social Darwinist ideas advanced by some of China's leading scientists … this theory rested on the outmoded science of eugenics …’

Kaixin – We assume Professor Greenhalgh has unassailable evidence for this and it is not just from a group of academics staring into dark spaces. Xiaosui is adamant that such a policy could not have been kept secret and the Chinese people would have been outraged. More telling, she points to the immediate change in policy that allowed rural families to have two children. This somewhat demolishes the ‘eugenic’ conspiracy theory of Professor Greenhalghs’.

 


‘ … discriminated against whole classes of low-quality people: "rural residents …’

Kaixin – ‘low-quality people’ are Professor Greenhalgh’s chosen words. Either that or she got them from one of her Chinese academic friends. No surprises for guessing where he got it from. To understand the city/rural divide in China is to understand a lot about China.




‘ … while others (rural people for example) have been essentially abandoned as useless to the modernization effort."…’

Kaixin – The rural people were the basis for the modernisation of China. They were certainly used for the first twenty or so years. However it must be seen in context. Before Mao the living conditions for rural China were abject. Under Mao they improved greatly. During the first twenty years of China’s modernisation the wages sent back to the village from the city by the rural migrant works further improved conditions in rural China. So Kaixin strongly questions Professor Greenhalgh’s observation, ‘… essentially abandoned …’. Now the focus of Beijing is well and truly on improving the living conditions and opportunities of the people in rural China.




‘ Many urban Chinese have internalized the bias against the family and, as described by Ms Greenhalgh, feel little obligation to care for their parents, want no children and think only of getting rich.’

Kaixin – What a patronising generalisation. It has to come from the rarefied air of China’s academia.

‘Dark spaces abound everywhere, I grasp all around for meaning … find only air.’

It is far more complex that that. Yes, there is an observable move in that direct in the cities. However, it is also a function of rapid moderisation and economic growth. Chinese society in the cities are in a state of flux.

From a traditional value perspective, it is an un-expected and un-welcome consequence of the one-child policy.

From Kaixin’s perspective it is certainly not universal and cannot be used to make a generalised conclusion about society in China.



‘ … "State power now reaches not only into the bedroom, intruding on sexual negotiations and reproductive deliberations.... It also stretches into the womb, deemed the well-spring of generativity for the woman, her kin, and the community ... to the making of life itself." …’

Kaixin – This is where Professor Greenhalgh’s agenda is exposed.

 

‘ Ms. Greenhalgh is well-connected in China and enjoys considerable prestige in her field. Will Beijing's leaders listen to her suggestion and act?’

Kaixin – Kaixin is also well-connected, to the average people of China. Not the academic elite in their rarefied air … thank goodness.



Time dictates that Kaixin leave this response. Kaixin is preparing an article on China’s one-child policy from the perspective of ‘middle’ China, which will be available in the next week or so.

 

The Age   3/1/2011

Runaway China puts on brakes

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard - London

THE yuan yesterday strengthened beyond 6.6 to the US dollar for the first time since 1993 on speculation that China will allow the currency to advance in an effort to tame inflation.

The slowdown suggests the authorities are at last gaining traction in their ever-more zealous efforts to stop overheating, though many analysts say the credit bubble has already gone too far to avoid trouble this year.

Kaixin OpEd – What pejorative terms these hacks use.

‘ …panicking Beijing's policymakers’

‘ … ever-more zealous efforts’

These hacks are sitting at the feet of economists from the west, waiting for pearls of wisdom to drop from above.

I have to tell you, that is not a pearl of wisdom, it’s a dibble of spit.

These are the same western economists who either caused the GFC or completely failed to see it coming.

They now rush around, the masters of hindsight, and tell the China how to fix everything from their supposed economic problems to how to wipe dribble from their chins.

China has got it right so far …. it’s a fair assumption that China will continue to get it right.

China is fully aware that the worst thing it could do would be to listen to the advice from western economists.

Note that Kaixin, against all the odds, refrained from commenting on this hack's name ..... against all the odds.

 

 

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Graeme has been using ChinesePod since 2007

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Set in Zanzibar in 1910, it is the story of two people from different worlds falling in love. Susan immerses herself in Zanzibar. Asim falls in love with this woman from the nation that killed his wife. Susan is a spy. Asim is the chief advisor to the Sultan of Zanzibar. Germany and France are holding secret negotiations to form a Pan European alliance, which would isolate Britain and destroy her power. Susan and Asim are caught up in all this and their love is finally dashed on the cold, hard reality of international high politics.

 

 

Available on Amazon's Kindle $4.99 - Over 400 Pages

 

 

 

 

 Chapter One

Zanzibar

'A maharaja’s ruby cast on a Persian carpet by the blackest of hands'

 

 

Their souls danced, honouring his promise.

The ancient dhow stirred in the soft morning breeze. Like a sleepy lion, it began to move through the water, snuffling about the other boats on the harbour; some scurrying, some at anchor, some darting before a brief gust of wind. The lateen sails a bustling panorama of blood-red and sun-bleached white.

Aft, the woman's eyes searched the skyline, drinking in the architecture of Stone Town, the heart of Zanzibar; its jagged, cluttered silhouette so familiar, so much a part of her soul.

Abruptly, her eyes ceased their restless searching, jagged by an invisible hook, transfixed by the grand buildings on the northern shore, Beit-al-Ajaib, the House of Wonders, Palace to the great Sultan of Zanzibar. The distinctive architecture captured in the tropical light: coconut white outlined by contrasting shadow plays of pepper black.

A smile, ever so slight, started to play on the edge of her mouth then disappeared. A memory that should have been fond instantly turned to sharp unbearable pain. Her eyes hardened and moved on.

Without warning the captain threw the rudder over. Stumbling, the woman barked her shin on a wooden box, a rough-hewn coffin. She recoiled, knocking over an untidy stack of cane baskets. Imprisoned in the baskets, rusty cockerels, their scruffy heads straining through the latticework, snapped at her, cried out to her; their raucous din overwhelming her, drowning her.

Dimly, through the fog of noise, the strident swearing of the sailors in Kiswahili seeped into her conscious. Understanding, she smiled mirthlessly.

The coffin had been carelessly stowed, a chore, rather than a labour of respect or love.

 

 

 

 

London 1910

 

“Hello, who are you? I am Oliver, is Edward at home?”

The words were spoken by a tall, impeccably dressed young man as he rushed into Edward’s flat shaking off surplus water and calling for whisky while shoving his umbrella into a stand. It was a blustery, grey, bitterly cold February afternoon in the heart of London. He brushed a curl of soft auburn hair from his forehead and smiled charmingly.

Susan laughed, her hazel eyes dancing with the exhilaration of the new. “Yes, he is having a bath. I think he is trying to get warm. I’m Susan, Susan Carey, his sister.”

“Ahhh yes, from Australia. How do you do?” said Sir Oliver, smiling broadly and offering his hand. He noticed the laughter in her eyes, and the depth, particularly the depth, intensified by jade flecks that made them striking and alluring. “So, you have arrived, good trip I trust.”

“I am very well thank you, and yes, it was a good trip,” replied Susan.

He laughed and glanced at the sitting room, “whisky?”

“Oh, I’m sorry, please come in…….. that was silly of me, after all, it is your flat.”

Oliver smiled and gestured for Susan to lead the way. He followed her into the room, and after helping himself to a generous portion of whisky, walked over to the fire.

Shortly after, Edward, wrapped in a huge ruby-coloured dressing gown and wiping soap from his ear strode into the room. He was of similar age to Oliver, late twenties, well built, if slightly podgy, with dark auburn hair and a full moustache. Susan looked up and smiled to herself, she could see now where he had picked up some of his new mannerisms.

“Thought I could hear voices. I see you two have met, no need for introductions then.”

As he was speaking, Edward walked to the side table and grabbed a whisky decanter by the neck. He glanced at Oliver who nodded. A long finger snaked into one of the tumblers followed by the distinctive clink of crystal. He swept the decanter off the table and carried it to where Oliver was sitting. After pouring the whisky, he sank into a lounge chair and sipped from his glass, enjoying the warm glow as it spread through his body.

Suddenly he sat up exclaiming, “Sorry sis, would you like something to drink?”

“Kind of you to remember, but no thank you, and yes, Oliver has already inquired.”

Edward nodded and sank back into his lounge chair.

They chatted, tentatively at first, getting to know one another. Edward had not seen Susan for two years and was unsure how his sister would take his new relationship. Oliver was intrigued by Susan. An attractive, self-assured young lady of high intelligence with a degree was a rare find. And, as fate would have it, she was also a trained and experienced teacher. He suggested a picnic at Oxford, which was met with ready acquiescence. Arrangements were made for the following Sunday.

“I’ll see if the Rolls is available,” mused Oliver. “Must ring father, haven’t spoken to him in ages.”

Oliver, Sir Oliver Marchmaine, was an unaffected young man of intense intelligence who saw life as a great adventure to be lived to the full. He was also unyieldingly loyal to his country, England, which is why he had joined Military Intelligence on leaving Oxford.

It was 1910 and Europe was stirring. It was a time full of interest, intrigue and danger. The European chessboard was becoming increasingly complex, the moves more subtle. A time when an unexpected move or feint could have profound consequences.

 

 

Regaining her balance, the woman’s eyes were drawn, hesitantly at first, resisting back to Beit-al-Ajaib. She wondered if it was still the same. Still the same centre of power and intrigue that had been so much a part of her life all those years before; that had defined her life.

She remembered those first few moments, remembered standing in the foyer of the palace, .………… remembered the breathtakingly beautiful Persian tapestry ........

The sea breeze stirred her clothes. She smiled a little sadly, and in her mind the tapestry gently swayed. Two small apparitions ran giggling up the stairs: two small exquisitely rich burkas disappearing along the first floor landing. Childish squeals of mischief and joy left in the air.......

“Move to seaward, you accused of Allah! Move!”

Her thoughts were clawed back to the dhow, the captain crashing the tiller over to avoid another boat on the crowded harbour. The woman instinctively ducked her head to avoid the heavy boom as it swung over her, the rusty cockerels squawked their raucous indignation, their heads straining through the latticework, relentless.

The collision avoided, the dhow continued on its way. The cacophony dying down to the occasional command by the captain or the cry of a seagull.

The woman's thoughts returned to Beit-al-Ajaib

  …………. laughing and giggling, girls of seven or eight. A door on the first floor slammed and all sounds of them disappeared. Silence. The woman smiled. She could see herself, a young woman, dressed plainly, unselfconsciously, her sexuality tantalisingly just out of reach, hidden beneath the thin veil of her clothing. She remembered standing alone in the foyer, looking around, perplexed. Asim came through a door to the left of the tapestry.

“Salaam.”

The woman started and looked around. Then, realising, was cold again. Alone again. Alone, rocking to and fro to the rythm of the sea. Alone, beside a rough-hewn coffin.

 

 

 

 

 

Now Available on Amazon's Kindle $4.99 - Over 400 Pages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graeme has been using ChinesePod since 2007

"I highly recommend ChinesePod, I haven't found any Online teaching programmes that come close."

 

 

 

Chapter One

Zanzibar

'A maharaja’s ruby cast on a Persian carpet by the blackest of hands'

The ancient dhow stirred in the soft morning breeze, moving through the water like a sated lion, snuffling about the other boats on the harbour; some scurrying, some at anchor, some darting before a brief gust of wind. The lateen sails a bustling panorama of blood-red and sun-bleached white.

Aft, the woman's eyes searched the skyline, drinking in the architecture of Stone Town, the heart of Zanzibar; its jagged, cluttered silhouette so familiar, so much a part of her soul.

Abruptly, her eyes ceased their restless searching, jagged by an invisible hook, transfixed by the grand buildings on the northern shore, Beit-al-Ajaib, the House of Wonders, Palace to the great Sultan of Zanzibar. The distinctive architecture captured in the tropical light: coconut white outlined by contrasting shadow plays of pepper black.

A smile, ever so slight, started to play on the edge of her mouth, then disappeared. A memory that should have been fond instantly turning to sharp unbearable pain. Her eyes hardened and moved on.

Without warning the captain threw the rudder over. Stumbling, the woman barked her shin on a wooden box, a rough-hewn coffin. She recoiled, knocking over an untidy stack of cane baskets. Imprisoned in the baskets, rusty cockerels, their scruffy heads straining through the latticework, snapped at her, cried out to her; their raucous din overwhelming her, drowning her.

Dimly, through the fog of noise, the strident swearing of the sailors in Kiswahili seeped into her conscious. Understanding, she smiled mirthlessly.

The coffin had been carelessly stowed, a chore, rather than a labour of respect or love.

 

 

London 1910

“Hello, who are you? I am Oliver, is Edward at home?”

The words were spoken by a tall, impeccably dressed young man rushing into Edward’s flat, shaking off surplus water and calling for whisky while shoving his umbrella into a stand; a shaggy grey Irish wolfhound, impeccably dressed by savile row.

Susan laughed, her hazel eyes dancing with the exhilaration of the new. “Yes, he is having a bath. I think he is trying to get warm. I’m Susan, Susan Carey, his sister.

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Pick'n Season

Short stories on a theme set in Tasmania, Australia

Where style and story telling are explored.

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The Cultural Revolution through my Eyes

By Zhou Xiaosui

$US2.99

I was born in 1966, the year China the Culture Revolution began. My mother told me when I was just born that a nurse held me in her arms and said, "come, look at this girl, she is so pretty, her eyes are so big". Another nurse who was in the room standing in front of the window, said, "come here and look at the people marching down the street wearing high caps!"

They were the people the Gong Chan Party (The Communist Party) had branded as counter-revolutionary. They were being marched down the street as an example.

This is the story of my life, and my family's life, in the time of the Cultural Revolution. I hope you will be interested in seeing China through my eyes.

 

Chapter One

I was Born in this Time

This was a time of unrest and uncertainty. A time that was to last for 10 long years and profoundly affected my family.

Just after I was born, the Government accused my father of being a counter-revolutionary because his family had moved from China and all lived overseas. So he lost his job as a teacher. He wasn’t allowed to work and had to stay at home reflecting on what he had done wrong. This was bad for my father, but it was good for me. My father could look after me at home, and over the early years of my growing up I became very close to my father who was also my first teacher.

I remember, he hung a blanket by the four corners to become a hammock, and he put me inside. He would rock me to and fro when I cried or became restless. He needed to write two pieces for the Government about his thinking and saying sorry that his family left China and lived overseas. He also had to embroider a Mao Zhengdong photo.

Just like this, my father looked after me and finished his thinking “reconstruct”.

My parents told me I was a lambkin, a fat lot cry. My father really loved me. At that time, no-one listened for him, so he talked to me everyday. He talked and talked and I laughed and laughed. My father said he looked at me and I made him so happy.

By the time I was one year old, I had worn out four blankets!

When I was one year old, my father who had lost his job as a teacher, had to go to a Government building company to become a general labourer. It was very hard work for a teacher. At night he had to go to re-education meetings. When I was older and started to understand something of what had happened in my family, my sister, who is six years older than me, told me, “in this time, many nights she saw my father come back from the meeting with bruises and wounds all over the body." These had been inflicted by the Hong Wei Bing. My mother, who was a Doctor, cried and helped my father clean the wounds. These beatings went on night after night, my father wanted to die. My mother told him, “I need you, your two children need you, they need to have a father, you must live!’

Hong Wei Bing: Hong = red; wei = to guard, to protect; bing = soldier

In Chinese culture, ‘hong’ is lucky and represents good.

The Hong Wei Bing was the Communists Party’s youth cadre. It was made up of students in high school aged between 12 and 18. They were given authority over any person branded as a counter-revolutionary. They were, of course, too young and callow to be given that much power, so they abused it. It would be like giving the students at your local High School authority, without boundaries, over anyone in your town who did not seem to conform, including their teachers.

The Government officials ran the re-education meeting with the Hong Wei Bing.

The Hong Wei Bing harassed anyone who was at the meeting. Asking questions like, ‘Did you do the bad thing for the Government, for Mao?’, ‘Do you love Mao?’, ‘Why does your family live overseas?’ ………… questions that had to be answered quickly and with enthusiasm. If the Hong Wei Bing were not satisfied with the answer, or even if they did not like your demeanor, of if they just wanted to hurt you, then they would beat you up. Many people died from these beatings.

My father did not, he lived.

 

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My Father's Wisdom

By Zhou Xiaosui

I was born in 1966, the year China the Culture Revolution began. My mother told me when I was just born that a nurse held me in her arms and said, "come, look at this girl, she is so pretty, her eyes are so big". Another nurse who was in the room standing in front of the window, said, "come here and look at the people marching down the street wearing high caps!"

They were the people the Gong Chan Party (The Communist Party) had branded as counter-revolutionary. They were being marched down the street as an example.

These are some of the stories my father taught my in this time.

$US2.99