Stories by GP Mills (Editor)
Erotic China
ARCHIVES
Nursery Rhymes
« Learning Chinese as a 2nd Language from an adult 'Westerner's Perspective' | Main | What does Kaixin mean in English »
Monday
Jul182011

CCTV (China Television) - Learn to Speak Chinese

 


Introduction to Chinese

 好好学习,天天向上。

 

 

 

 

"Learn to Speak Chinese" is a 15-minute program on CCTV-News. Starting from the early 90's, many series of "Learn to Speak Chines" have been made, including "Hello, Beijing", "International Business Chinese", "Chinese 400", "Kindergarden Chinese", "After School Chinese", "Communicate in Chinese", "Travel in Chinese" and "Growing Up with Chinese".

This program not only aroused great interest among viewers to learn Chinese, but also popularized knowledge about the Chinese economy, culture, and tourism. "Learn to Speak Chinese" continues to playing an active role in helping the world learn more about China. Hope you to join us.

 


 

Growing up With Chinese 成长汉语

Entertaining, fun and easy to follow. This series teaches 300 of the most commonly spoken Chinese phrases to teenagers. It is hosted by Charlotte MacInnis, known to the Chinese audiences as Ai Hua.

 

 

CONTENTS

If you want to learn to speak Chinese you must first learn Pinyin 拼音

Introduction to Pin Yin - the 4 'tones'

The full meaning of Chinese words

Pronunciation of Chinese words is in two parts

Remember that a language is like music

Pin Yin v Chinese Script

The Bi Hua & Pianpang Bushou

Chinese Word for the Day

Chinese Phrase for the Day

Chinese Grammar for the Day

Learning Chinese as a 2nd Language from an adult 'Westerner's Perspective'

CCTV (China Television) - Learn to Speak Chinese

Learn Chinese in China with AllSet Learning Shanghai

Chinese Names for Fingers

Practise your Chinese for FREE - Chatting to China on QQ

 

 

 

ChinaLoveCupid/ChineseLoveLinks - Serious Chinese Dating Relationships

 

Books by the Editors

 

Set in Zanzibar

'A maharaja’s ruby cast on a Persian carpet by the blackest of hands'

 

 

Chapter One

London 1910

“Hello, who are you? I am Oliver, is Edward at home?”

The words were spoken by a tall, impeccably dressed young man rushing into Edward’s flat, shaking off surplus water and calling for whisky while shoving his umbrella into a stand; a shaggy grey Irish wolfhound, impeccably dressed by savile row.

Susan laughed, her hazel eyes dancing with the exhilaration of the new. “Yes, he is having a bath. I think he is trying to get warm. I’m Susan, Susan Carey, his sister.

...

They chatted, tentatively at first, getting to know one another. Edward had not seen Susan for two years and was unsure how his sister would take his new relationship. Oliver was intrigued by Susan. An attractive, self-assured young lady of high intelligence with a degree was a rare find. And, as fate would have it, she was also a trained and experienced teacher. He suggested a picnic at Oxford, which was met with ready acquiescence.

“I’ll see if the Rolls is available,” mused Oliver. “Must ring father, haven’t spoken to him in ages.”

Oliver, Sir Oliver Marchmaine, was an unaffected young man of intense intelligence who saw life as a great adventure to be lived to the full. He was also unyieldingly loyal to his country, England, which is why he had joined Military Intelligence on leaving Oxford.

It was 1910 and Europe was stirring. It was a time full of interest, intrigue and danger, the European chessboard becoming increasingly complex, the moves more subtle. A time when an unexpected move or feint could have profound consequences.

...

The woman smiled to acknowledge Asim’s greeting, his eyes looking directly at her from within the folds of an impossibly white kufiyya. A peregrine falcon: lean, intense, beautiful, with a hunter’s gaze.

“You were sent by Sir Edward Clark?” asked Asim.

The question was direct, intended merely to ascertain the relevant information. He did not respond to her femininity. Did not glance she remembered, allowed herself to remember. The counterpoint between the masculine and the feminine was missing. Something in him, that part of him, had withered to the point of extinction. She did not know that then. That was to be part of her journey.

“Yes, my name is Susan, Susan Carey. I am the teacher.”

 

$US4.99

 

 

Pick'n Season

Short stories on a theme set in Tasmania, Australia

Where style and story telling are explored.

$US2.99

 

 

The Cultural Revolution through my Eyes

By Zhou Xiaosui

$US2.99

I was born in 1966, the year China the Culture Revolution began. My mother told me when I was just born that a nurse held me in her arms and said, "come, look at this girl, she is so pretty, her eyes are so big". Another nurse who was in the room standing in front of the window, said, "come here and look at the people marching down the street wearing high caps!"

They were the people the Gong Chan Party (The Communist Party) had branded as counter-revolutionary. They were being marched down the street as an example.

This is the story of my life, and my family's life, in the time of the Cultural Revolution. I hope you will be interested in seeing China through my eyes.

 

Chapter One

I was Born in this Time

This was a time of unrest and uncertainty. A time that was to last for 10 long years and profoundly affected my family.

Just after I was born, the Government accused my father of being a counter-revolutionary because his family had moved from China and all lived overseas. So he lost his job as a teacher. He wasn’t allowed to work and had to stay at home reflecting on what he had done wrong. This was bad for my father, but it was good for me. My father could look after me at home, and over the early years of my growing up I became very close to my father who was also my first teacher.

I remember, he hung a blanket by the four corners to become a hammock, and he put me inside. He would rock me to and fro when I cried or became restless. He needed to write two pieces for the Government about his thinking and saying sorry that his family left China and lived overseas. He also had to embroider a Mao Zhengdong photo.

Just like this, my father looked after me and finished his thinking “reconstruct”.

My parents told me I was a lambkin, a fat lot cry. My father really loved me. At that time, no-one listened for him, so he talked to me everyday. He talked and talked and I laughed and laughed. My father said he looked at me and I made him so happy.

By the time I was one year old, I had worn out four blankets!

When I was one year old, my father who had lost his job as a teacher, had to go to a Government building company to become a general labourer. It was very hard work for a teacher. At night he had to go to re-education meetings. When I was older and started to understand something of what had happened in my family, my sister, who is six years older than me, told me, “in this time, many nights she saw my father come back from the meeting with bruises and wounds all over the body." These had been inflicted by the Hong Wei Bing. My mother, who was a Doctor, cried and helped my father clean the wounds. These beatings went on night after night, my father wanted to die. My mother told him, “I need you, your two children need you, they need to have a father, you must live!’

Hong Wei Bing: Hong = red; wei = to guard, to protect; bing = soldier

In Chinese culture, ‘hong’ is lucky and represents good.

The Hong Wei Bing was the Communists Party’s youth cadre. It was made up of students in high school aged between 12 and 18. They were given authority over any person branded as a counter-revolutionary. They were, of course, too young and callow to be given that much power, so they abused it. It would be like giving the students at your local High School authority, without boundaries, over anyone in your town who did not seem to conform, including their teachers.

The Government officials ran the re-education meeting with the Hong Wei Bing.

The Hong Wei Bing harassed anyone who was at the meeting. Asking questions like, ‘Did you do the bad thing for the Government, for Mao?’, ‘Do you love Mao?’, ‘Why does your family live overseas?’ ………… questions that had to be answered quickly and with enthusiasm. If the Hong Wei Bing were not satisfied with the answer, or even if they did not like your demeanor, of if they just wanted to hurt you, then they would beat you up. Many people died from these beatings.

My father did not, he lived.

 

$US2.99

 

 

My Father's Wisdom

By Zhou Xiaosui

I was born in 1966, the year China the Culture Revolution began. My mother told me when I was just born that a nurse held me in her arms and said, "come, look at this girl, she is so pretty, her eyes are so big". Another nurse who was in the room standing in front of the window, said, "come here and look at the people marching down the street wearing high caps!"

They were the people the Gong Chan Party (The Communist Party) had branded as counter-revolutionary. They were being marched down the street as an example.

These are some of the stories my father taught my in this time.

$US2.99